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spamassassin-dev: [Bug 5647] spamcop reports truncation differen

[Bug 5647] spamcop reports truncation differennt than at spamcop.net

From: <bugzilla-daemon_at_nospam>
Date: Mon Nov 07 2011 - 18:47:03 GMT
To: dev@spamassassin.apache.org

https://issues.apache.org/SpamAssassin/show_bug.cgi?id=5647

--- Comment #7 from Kevin A. McGrail <kmcgrail@pccc.com> 2011-11-07 18:47:03 UTC ---
(In reply to comment #5)
> Since it says 50kB, to me that's 50 * 1024; no question.
>
> This "k=1,000" view was introduced by engineers who don't understand and are
> ignorant of computer science's 50+ year history that a kilobyte has always been
> 2^10 or 1,024 bytes.
>
> I agree: Bug is invalid/won't fix.

First time I ever saw this was from MARKETING people for HDs so they could
define 1000 * 1000 * 1000 as a GB instead of 1024 * 1024 * 1024 so that drive
could be advertised at "larger" than actual capacities.

Apparently IEEE is a shill for them as well ;-)
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigabyte)

You'll find this type of warning on probably every storage item on the planet
(this one is from Western Digital):

As used for storage capacity, one megabyte (MB) = one million bytes, one
gigabyte (GB) = one billion bytes, and one terabyte (TB) = one trillion bytes.
Total accessible capacity varies depending on operating environment. As used
for buffer or cache, one megabyte (MB) = 1,048,576 bytes. As used for transfer
rate or interface, megabyte per second (MB/s) = one million bytes per second,
megabit per second (Mb/s) = one million bits per second, and gigabit per second
(Gb/s) = one billion bits per second.

In the end, I blame marketing people. Even if I'm wrong, I still blame
marketing on general principle.

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